Think like a user! The secret to improving your website’s UX

Written by  Lina Abascal and Gog Zalibekyan / 02 February 2016
Think like a user! The secret to improving your website’s UX
When building your website, it can be hard to separate yourself from your role on the inside of the business to thinking like your user or customer. Users don’t know your business as well as you do, and they may not be as technologically savvy as you are. If you are doing your job right as a business owner or marketer, you are driving people to your website to learn more, either on a browser or these days, on mobile.

So now your first step is accomplished! Someone is on your site. So how do you make sure they have a great experience and are guided through your website on the path you have set up for them, answering their questions and communicating your story effectively? This is called the UX, or user experience. UX design and optimization is very important when creating your website, it can make or break a user’s impression of your business and likelihood of converting to becoming a customer.

Here are 5 tips from the pros at ucraft to help ensure your users have a great experience.


Clear navigation
This one is obvious. Your user needs to be able to quickly and clearly figure out how to get where they want to go. A popular method of achieving this is a navigation header. An alternative to this that is slightly less clear and requires an additional step is the “hamburger menu” or a button that requires a click before showing the navigation options hidden inside of it. There is some industry debate over the effectiveness of hamburger menus because they require an extra step from the user which is proven to be harder to prompt. We suggest navigation bars with subjects or topics a user can click on that then drives them to a page about that content. An easy and efficient way to get back to the homepage is also very important. Having a header above your navigation bar with a large logo that when clicked links back to the homepage, or a home section within your navigation bar are popular ways to achieving this.
Clear CTA buttons with the right color and size
Your user needs to understand what elements of your website are meant to be interacted with. If certain text is linked, certain images are buttons, or you are looking to prompt any sort of engagement, these actions need to be clear. Do not overwhelm your user with too many calls to action, buttons, or links. A simple, “learn more” or “request a quote” button that prompts your user to submit information such as name, email, and phone number are not intimidating and allow your team to contact the user to follow up and help drive the conversation. Downloadable guides or white papers are another way to gather contact information from your user while providing them with something in return that they can obtain through one click.Your user needs to understand what elements of your website are meant to be interacted with. If certain text is linked, certain images are buttons, or you are looking to prompt any sort of engagement, these actions need to be clear. Do not overwhelm your user with too many calls to action, buttons, or links. A simple, “learn more” or “request a quote” button that prompts your user to submit information such as name, email, and phone number are not intimidating and allow your team to contact the user to follow up and help drive the conversation. Downloadable guides or white papers are another way to gather contact information from your user while providing them with something in return that they can obtain through one click.

Prioritize the right content
If there is imagery or content you want to make sure all of your users see, make sure it’s on the homepage rather than buried on a page deep within your menu. Use as little text as possible on your homepage, as to ensure your user digests as much as possible (sadly, people don’t like to read!). More specialized or niche content can live within specialized sub-pages of your website where users looking for specific information can find it. Basics such as WHO / WHAT/ and WHY (value propositions) should be prominent on your homepage.

Use the right fonts and font sizes
We’ve discussed on the ucraft blog in the past the importance of having an aesthetically pleasing website. Everyone likes a modern and beautiful site. Choosing fonts that are within your brand’s style (and ideally live within your branding or style guide) is important for consistency and branding. Font sizing is also important because users are used to the concept of larger = more important and different colors = clickable. Don’t stray from these concepts, it is harder to re-train your user than follow and make use of their existing instincts with engaging with websites.

Too many choices = No Choice
Having multiple ways for your users to navigate through your site is inevitable, different types of users want different and different amounts information. But the truth is, giving your user too many choices can confuse and intimidate rather than inspire them. When too many options or paths become available on your user’s journey through your site, they are more likely to get lost or frankly, give up, before taking the time to figure out how to get where they want. Make it easy for your user to make choices and find information on your site.

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